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should have shown more courage. >> there were. on civil rights he did not use the bully pulpit as well as he should have. >> rose: richard nixon said he was devious. >> yes. you can have in great quote that eisnehower was a more devious man than people realized and i mean that in the best sense of the word. and he was being sincere and wasn't being funny it is true, eisenhower was deef you in the best sense of the word. >> rose: devious in what way? >> well, he would play dumb is one thing i love about the guy guy talkable about his confidence, once before a conference his aides are coming and saying mr. president you have to be careful, you have to be careful and eisenhower said don't worry i will just confuse them. and he did. and can you imagine a president today being intentionally kind of confusing and dim-witted, but it was useful for eisenhower. >> rose: something about they don't know how dumb i am or i am dumber than they think. >> he was quoted as a dumb bunny he is not, he used to reached micha but it was effective to be underestimated and learned that early in life. maybe h
important civil rights cases to come before them in years. affirmative action for college admissions. we are going to break that down and much more after this. >>> former model olga created. she knows contents sells. she also launched a companion online magazine as an opening source important what's in. for more of "your business," sunday mornings, 7:30 on msnbc. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare pa
to ut. >> reporter: conservative groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambitiono major in science and engineering. >> almost a decade ago, then justice sandra day o'connor wrote a majority opinion that said that the university of michigan law school had a compelling interest in promoting class diversity and suggested affirmative action might still be needed for another 25 years. o'connor has since left the court, leading to speculation that the court's conservatives could now strike a blow to preferences. joe johns, cnn, washington. >> thank you, joe johns. so jeff toobin, this is the question. does this texas case raise any new and diinctive questions about this, about affirmative action, or is this one of those second bites at the apple, merely another opportunity for a different supreme court with brand-new justices
. in a "there was a country," ch right about civil war. and larry bowman in at the sumwalt writes about how wrong -- admiral zumwalt. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on both tv and at booktv.org. >> this month as the president of candidates debate, we are asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of the studentcam video competition. in a short video, students will answer the question what the most important issue is in the campaign for 2013. it is open for students' grades 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to studentcam.org. >> washington journal continues. host: in the segment we will talk about variety. our guest, melanie eversley joins us from new york. welcome. guest: thank you. host: we invited to specifically to talk about what has been happening in pennsylvania. what happened in that state concerning voter i.d.? guest: essentially, pennsylvania was a number of of states -- was one of a number of states across the country attempting to pass legislation that would req
important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of this novel that last very much to the present day. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more of our recent visit to augusta, maine. for more information on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia off
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
is gone. it may never be seen again in the history of civilization and it's stored right here. without the voice of the cameras they would really have no voice and these landscapes would just disappear and nobody would be the wiser. it would be as if a tree fell in the forest and no one was there to hear the sound. it's the exact same conundrum. if a glacier melts in the arctic and there's no camera there to see it did it ever really exist? did it ever really happen? well, the cameras give life and voice to those processes and places. the scientific language that this story is told in is profoundly, profoundly, profoundly important. and it's what we build the pictures on. so i don't want to forget that. but then when you stack the visualization on top of the scientific understanding and then you marry those two things together, the art and the science, and you have something really powerful. >> when i saw the nasa satellite imagery of greenland i thought -- i honestly thought, "why doesn't jim balog let nasa do it? he doesn't have to take the risk anymore. this technology's doing what
be seen again in the history of civilization and it's stored right here. >>> james balog has come here from iceland and alaska with some urgency because what he has to tell us, barack obama and mitt romney simply refuse to talk about. welcome, james balog. >> i'm glad to be here, thank you. >> i've read the science on climate change. and then i read your book and saw your film and suddenly i more than get it. it gets me. does that make sense to you? >> yeah, it does. and that's the same reaction we've heard from many, many, many people across all parts of the philosophical and political spectrum. it really is this convergence of art and science that i think really hits people. and yeah, to be honest with you, having learned about these kind of sciences back when i was in my 20s, i tried to forget about the sciences for many decades. and i went off and saw the world as a visual artist. and then in this project i came back and really infused the science back into my thinking about, thinking and feeling about the world as an artist. and it turned out that this combination of art and scien
. >> to me, it's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs it, if they're sick. and i think people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot, they have to wear a mask. one hospital commented saying, so far all employees have been compliant. >>> the number of cases of fungal meningitis is growing. the cdc reports 47 people have been infected and 12 more than its last update. but as many as 300 people were injected with the tainted steroid that is spreading the disease. it was distributed in 23 states, but has been recalled. five people have died. our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta has more on this. >> randi, it's worth pointing out, again, that we're talking about fungal meningitis as opposed to bacterial meningitis or viral meningitis. the type that you typically hear about being spread, for example, on college campuses. fungal meningit
've been on it. and i would hope eventually that we would be able to conform with title 6 of the civil rights act which means we'd provide languages for everybody. languages change from time to time. now we're getting more arabic languages and in the future we may get more of the southern african languages based on the number of refugees we see moving around. and we also find the governor and president are willing to provide the dream act. and, so, we have some new hope. but we haven't gotten to the legalization of the undocumented. it has not moved, in spite of the fact mayor bloomberg supports it. and he thinks we need them, and certainly is true and he thinks they would pay taxes and build communities. also, professor silbani from stanford thinks that they will -- are we under two minutes, too? oh, well, i just want to call
when the rising tide with the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of people might age were heading down to mississippi to break the back of segregation in. i was living in cambridge at the time. this was the 1960's. a volkswagen bug. i drove across town into the black community. i was never there before. although i had grown up just outside of boston. a revered figure of the black community both the associative doctor came and i asked him may i be of use? he said yes, young man. you can. i am glad you came here to talk with me in your own home town. you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice. you can find the struggle here. come into our schools to help our children. i walked into the headquarters and said i will be a teacher. and had never heard of certification. [laughter] i knew nothing about teaching. they did not teach you anything useful at harvard. they still don't. [laughter] the first day i taught they sent me to teach kindergarten. the first time i ever taught in my life. i was terrified. i had no idea what you do with people that size. they we
became clear. obama's suffered on the civil-rights movement and of the new left. he determined to experience them vicariously. he tried drugs as he confessed and hence autobiography, "dreams from my father." rallied against south africa , political speeches, community organizers, tried to get in touch with the black experience a and in general search for meaning to use a formulation he could not to reject. he shared the 60s existentialist mood everyone must find his own meaning in life and find his own way. there is no meeting out there zero or objective source that one can point* to zero or rely on. he shared the determination to make history rather than and let it happen or to redeem in justice. roswell obama share the post modernist suspicion of the universal values are not universal and probably not true. one can see these ideas that work in "dreams from my father" the highly fictionalized memoir. politicians notoriously live. not a surprise. no future president ever boasted he was making stuff up to tell the story he -- the way he wanted to tell it. self creation is a very
from latino civil rights leader caesar chavez. the president and national latino leaders dedicated a new national monument for chavez today. we have a flurry of new tv ads to dissect. we're going to get to at least a couple we hope. first one, let me ask you, michelle, the romney campaign released a new tved a with a liar argument. here is a part of it. >> president obama continues to distort mitt romney's plan. the latest not telling the truth about the tax plan. even the obama campaign admitted it wasn't true. >> jennifer: actually i'm going to ask this one of karl, because the romney campaign isn't telling anybody whether the ad is running. >> i think it's disenginous and ironic that they would release an ad calls lying, and not tell anybody where it is returning. if you want to give 20% tax cuts to every american that is $5 trillion. what is difficult is to get really detailed on romney's plans when they are not laid out specifically. so what you find from the fact checkers is that they are not being completely accurate but they always put in there the discl
. and there is a political battle. >> with proposition 38 behind in the polls this civil rights attorney slammed a competing tax measure pushed by governor brown. proposition 30 funding public education through an income tax hike showing it may claim to fund schools but probably raided through the back door and her brother is funding nornl campaign. >> this is why sacramento is behind it. >> the staff does not want to happen. in fact, pro prop po ads have thus far stayed positive. >> i think they've taken their eye off the ball this, is no longer about students and future, funding our schools. this is about winning. >> the campaign did not return repeated calls and e mails but has says the proposal to raise the income tax is better investing $31 million so far to get voters to agree. >> we think the governor doesn't have has good as an idea as we do. >> the governor cannot let a negative ad go unanswered. >> look. the fact is that we didn't choose this course. >> this democratic strategist says both want to help schools but may end up doing the opposite. >> at the end of the day it doesn't help either campa
be taken into consideration as argument of>c[0 civil rights against an individual. falsely as it turned out later]ij1u of raping a young woman with a coke bottle in the st. francisúc hotel which ruined his career. is it a spectacle we crave in i> strongly suspect that should ross regains+íhl his elected position that san franciscans will be given a spectacle of7ñm, a long and hard working -- to show himself at the hel&m%sh mp of these issues with personal integrity and that is something which i submit we ei-are sorely in need of in this town. thank you9 p. >> well, i've been praying that i6g the lord would have me say the right words here and i've heard a lot of good speeches tor l. the best was that asian lady with the massage. that was a good÷Ñjpv one. this is totally reinstate him, give him double back pay and it's!z!/ all right. you should believe his wife also. okay? believe his wife. now -- and also i think the sheriff should go in there and sit down and dare anybody to arrest him, because he has been elec
with the community-based agencies and civil rights organizations that have had a very delivered reason to engage me on this, we will not be implementing the stop and frisk programs or variations of that here in san francisco. [applause] we do not wish to be distracted from the real reason we are here. we love our kids. we love our families in the bayview whether they are in sunnyvale or alice griffith or potrero hill or in the mission. we love them so much that we have to do more to care for them. we have to find those connections. [applause] there are too many stories that we are hearing from our clergy when it is too late. when we are having those individual funerals, when our parents and their brothers and sisters are crying over things that have already happened, where the jobs that we are creating did not reach these unfortunate young kids or our police commissioners and police chief working in concert with adult probation, juvenile probation, did not quite get the person who signed these papers, put their names to it saying, "i will not go back to where our was found with a gun or associate w
and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood leader and as feature of an affordable housing organization. i learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san francisco. >> what lessons did you learn after campaigning for supervisor? >> san franciscans are incredibly interested in their city government, local politics, and making sure that we remain the most amazing city in the world. i learned that san franciscans during campaign read everything they are sent in the mail. they love to meet the candidates and engage in conversations with them. i learned how important it is to build bridges between different communities, particularly communities of diversity that we have. i was incre
of civil rights, when first elected, he was one of the nation's youngest legislators. his son was also a delicate and is now a radio host here at wbal. >> i celebrate the great live that my father lived. the story he presented to all of us who are beneficiaries of his public policy initiative. >> his nephew says his uncle was a man like no other. he taught him about politics. >> he taught us what it meant to campaign, let's just say. he taught us how to knock on doors. he taught us to be close to people peeping he taught us about organization. you cannot just go out there and put your name on the ballot and expect people to votes. he said you always have to stay close to the people. he was the consummate politician and the consummate campaigner. >> but there were hard times. he served 16 months in federal prison after being convicted in 1987 of influence peddling. >> he had a smile on his face. he was just stronger. you know, they are not going to beat me down. he refused to let people beat him down. and even up into his passing, he was fighting. i saw him last week. >> no one's life i
believes she was rejected from the university of texas because she is white. her civil rights lawsuit challenges a 19-50's decision in favor of an african american student. that case led to the end of racial segregation in public institutions. justices will now be considering whether the high court believes affirmative action is still necessary in education. if you dont like the seats on c- t-a trains and buses, you now have a chance to voice your opinion. the active transportation alliance is taking a poll on their website, activetrans.org through the 14th. it wants to know if c-t-a riders prefer the individual bucket- style seats, the aisle facing bench seats, or if they have no preference at all. the survey comes after the c-t-a received complaints about the bench seating in new rail cars. the alliance will share survey results with the transit agency. to another waterfront is in talks of a makeover. >> this city of san antonio tx has a big major development along the river walk. it has been a huge doors attraction. you can only imagine what a development along the chicago river
at the tacoma, glenmont, u street and georgia avenue stations. several civil rights organizations are planning counter-ads. >>> a former cincinnati bengals cheerleader who admitted to having sex with a 17-year-old will not go to jail. sarah jones taught at the school where that teen attends and she has since agreed never to apply for another teaching job again. jones walked out of the courtroom actually hand in hand with that teenager. she's now working as a legal secretary. >>> the washington nationals are preparing for their first home playoff game after taking one on the chin in st. louis. jordan zimmerman got the start yesterday despite being 0-5 against the cards in the regular season. his bad luck against st. louis continued in the post season. zimmerman only lasted three innings giving up seven hits and five runs. the nats shuffled out seven different pitchers. as a group they gave up 12 runs. the cardinals crushed the nats 12-4. the series is at one game a piece. >> they got a split away from home and come home. do it in front of the home crowd instead. >>> encouraging news for the red
senate. he will be remembered as a prominent civil right leader, he spent 15 months in prison for influenced peddaling but those who knew him say that won't be his legacy. >> one hopes he will be remembered for the passion that he had for the -- for the issues that his family was very famous for. >> he died after a battle with cancer. he was 72 years old. >>> people were waiting for a classic fight tonight. we didn't really see one. biden and ryan went head to head over the economy, afghanistan and abortion. why does tonight's debate matter? we asked local experts. >> close race, going down to the wire it comes down to a handful of voters and states. >> it's so close. debates do matter. the president had momentum, romney had a lousy week and look at what happened after the debate. >> tonight is the only time they will debate. the president and romney will meet again on tuesday. this time they will talk about foreign policy. >>> when you shop for pet food you see all sorts of eye catching claim that make you want to pick one product or another. what do terms like all natur
civil rights lawsuit comes 10-years after the supreme court approved the use of race as a factor in the school admissions process. justices will consider whether affirmative action is still necessary in education. the death toll is mounting from the meningitis outbreak tied to contaminated steroid injections. a 70-year-old florida man is the latest victim to die in the outbreak of fungal meningitis that's now spread to ten states. he's one of 12 people killed by the disease, among more than 120 who've been infected. the contaminated steroid was produced by a massachusetts company and shipped to 23 states, including illinois. health officials say as many as 13 thousand people received injections to relieve back pain and other complaints and are at risk of infection. so far, about five percent of patients treated with the medication have contracted meningitis. >>two american scientists are the recipients of the 2012 nobel prize for chemistry. robert lefkowitz of duke university and brian kobilka of stanford are being honored for discovering the inner workings of receptors that allo
on a engagement tour with my civil rights organization, national action network. we're making sure that everyone gets their voice heard in 28 days. but the right wing is trying to scare voters away. look at this bulletin board. it's popping up in minority neighborhoods in milwaukie, wisconsin. with the big headline -- voter fraud is a felony. three years in prison $10,000 fine. and the woman on the right telling us -- we voted illegally. >>> in ohio this billboard is in a black neighborhood around cleveland. they went up last week just as early voting started. voting fraud is a felony 3 1/2 years, $10,000 fine. a private family foundation is reportedly behind them. what that means is a mystery. we tried to find out who they are. so far they haven't responded to our requests. city councilwoman fill is cleveland is determined to get answers. >> this is clearly an attempt at voter intimidation. i want to find out who this foundation is who paid for it, number one. they need to show their hand as well. you can't send intimidating messages to people. >> they're do
offenders and they are cunning and devious and to say their civil rights are violated, the first and 14th amendments, because they can't have a sign, you know, and halloween deck kra decorations to come into hair house, they've forfeited their right to have access to children. >> heather: and the attorney likening it to branding. and mentioning what they need to document let's look at the things required in the ordinance, or this law that was actually passed by the city of simi valley. first of all, a sign they have to post on their door, just says this, doesn't say i'm a sex offender, it says no candy or treats at this residence. they have to leave all exterior decorative and ornamental lighting off, 5:00 p.m. to midnight and, refrain from decorating their front yard and house exterior and don't answer the door to children trick-or-treating. >> essentially they are saying, you cannot try to lure these children. we know this is what you do. and we know you want children and know to -- sex with it i should say and you will not change your behavior and here, at the end of the day, when the
other political ends as i describe, it was always republicans pushing civil rights legislation, being blocked by democrats for five minutes in 1964 democrats pretended to care about black people, and then they just started slapping the civil rights label on causes having nothing to do with black people and, in fact, often opposed to black people. megyn: in today's day and age, i think the assumption is that democratic policies are better for blacks -- [laughter] because they believe in affirmative action, and today believe in sort of a hand up, and a lot of blacks are struggling in lower socioeconomic neighborhoods. and they believe democrats are empathetic to that situation. that's the line. >> that is certainly the line, and it is absolutely untrue. i mean, four years of obama there was an article going around yesterday on the drudge report that four years of obama has virtually wiped out the black middle class. that's just the economic point. never be fooled into thinking that what democrats care about is the poor, the elderly, minorities. what they care about are government sector
the oakland police department? civil rights attorneys are explaining why they are asking for a federal takeover. a motion was filed to put the department in receivership, for them the final straw was the latest federal monitoring report that provided no hope the monitor criticized the department's handling of officer involved shooting and oakland demonstration. >> we can't wait for more empty promises. we can't wait for officers, many of whom, most of whom are doing a great job here at oakland, to fail to get the training and supervision that they need. >> on the flip side the mayor and the police chief have said they believe the department is moving in the right direction and will work to keep it under control control. >> it wasn't the first time prosecutors claim a morgan hill mother used her 10-year-old daughter more than once to shoplift. prosecutors say when employees spotted marcie stealing on september 19th it was her second attempt. they were unable to catch her two weeks earlier. she was charged with commercial burglary and a count of contributing to the delinquency of a minor
's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot. and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs fit they are sick and people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot they have to wear a mask. >>> the unemployment rate fell in september. more people returned to the labor force and hiring was steady. in this week's smart is the new rich meet one guy who took a big risk to make a career change in a brightening job market. here's christine romans. >> reporter: he wanted to switch careers from operations in i.t. to marketing and big data. in a slow jobs market that takes training and risk. >> i decided to go back to business school and i went part time and realized that i needed even more training so i left my full time position and gained internship at cbs. and that was a great gateway. so the internship plus the mba, i was able to fortunately land at met life. looking at the data more on the marketing
in the summer that year when the rising tide in the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of young people my age or heading to mississippi to try to break the back of segregation in the south. i was living in cambridge at the time. one day i simply got in my car. this was the 1916s. it was a little par. and i drove across town into the black community. i had never been in the black community before although i had grown up just outside of boston and i went to a minister, a wonderful man, some of you may recall his name. a revered figure in the black community and some close associate of dr. king and i asked him simply may i be of use? and he said yes, young man, you can. and he said i am glad you are here to talk to me in your own home town because you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice in america. he said you can join the struggle here. come into schools and try to help our children. i walked into the headquarters of boston public school and said i am going to be a teacher. i had never heard of certification. i knew nothing about teaching. didn't teach anyth
. he missed out on the civil rights movement, and on the new left. but he determined to experience them vicariously. and so he tried drugs, as he confesses in his autobiography. he rallied against south africa, he gave political speeches, he community organized, he tried to get in touch with the black experience, and in general, he searched for meaning to use a formulation that he would not reject. in other words, he very much shared the '60s mood that everyone must find his own meaning in life. and find his own way in life. because there's no meaning out there, there's no objective source of meaning that one can point to or rely on. he shared the right to make history rather than to let it happen or trust it to redeem in justice in the own good time. and as well obama, i think, shared the post modernist suspicious that universal values, as he sometimes calls them, are not universal, and probably not true in any objective sense. one can see these ideas at work in dreams for my for, the heavily fictionalized autobiography or memoir he wrote. now politicians are known to lie. this is not
, delivering his historic address in 1964. it was a speech that changed the national debate on civil rights. well, here we are with an election 30 days away. and the debates are in spule swing. a new book, presidential courage, three speeches that changed america, takes a look at the moments that have truly inspire period our nation. warren kozak is the author and he is here live. >> thanks for having me on. >> jamie: this is inspiring. you certainly did your homework. i read the speeches, one is four paragraphs. >> linkon's second inaugural, four paragraphs. can you believe that? >> jamie: what does it take to inspire a nation? how important are the words that the presidents and presidential candidates say? >> critical, but what we are looking at are 3 speech, three presidents, three incredibly important junctures in our history. really the most dangerous momes in our history. and these three presidents through their words were able to give the country courage to make the changes that needed to be made. you don't hear that anywhere. >> jamie: you cover fdr, jfk and lincoln. how did you pic
of violating their civil rights by coercing their confessions. the city has defended 9 way it's conducted its investigation. the filmmaker refuse to share outtakes citing shield laws. >> we believe we are protected under the shield laws as journalists and we don't think it's fair for the government to intrude in our research. >> reporter: a lawyer for the city says the film isn't journalism because it advocates for the five. in a statement, the city says, quote, if the plaintiffs truly want an open airing of the facts, they should encourage the filmmakers not to hide anything. the filmmakers claim the documentary sticks to the facts. what do you make of the city trying to go after the outtakes for this film? >> the city needs to stop dragging their feet. i don't think they would find anything other than what they already know, that we were innocent and this is just going to continue to further restate that. >> reporter: yusef says no matter the outcome, he may never fully escape his nightmare that started in in park. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. >>> the world watches cape canaveral, florid
, okay he has the polls. today is a big day for many latinos and many civil rights and labor activists. the fact he dedicates this national monument on a day like today and the fact yes, we can can came from the united workers is a big deal, and it's a message to the latino community. >> each family has their own individuali issues. each person has factors that determine how engaged they are in the campaign, whether they can get out to vote and who they will vote for. generically speaking here, if you had to explain why there's this enthusiasm gap, if these numbers are accurate, what is the problem? >> i think you can look at it from what the gop has not done. i was speaking to a political scientist today who said in some states like nevada and colorado, the anti-immigrant rhetoric hurt in a year that they could have had more latino votes. the economy is not doing that well. >> i get when you look at arizona, why someone would be concerned and perhaps not support a jan brewer, given her actions in front of the mike and behind in her office when she signs legislation. i'm talking about
in the civil rights movement. one of the most tremendous people i have met in my life. she taught me a life. she died. a lot of us who will miss her terribly, pass on to her daughter tracy and her granddaughter maya you had a wonderful mother and grandmother and couldn't ask for anybody better. sweet woman. i know she is in especially looking down on us now. i'll -- she is in heaven looking down on us. i'll miss her very much. >> kimberly: very sweet. >> eric: i want to let everyone know david axelrod, yes, he did text me and said -- guess what? it's fundraising. over the weekend, yesterday, drew brees broke unitas 52-year-old record. do we have it? hopefully. >> wide open. there it is. drew brees to henderson. >> eric: all right. so the most games in a row with a touchdown pass bay quarterback. 52 years. brady has 37 games in a row currently. he is on brees' heel. good guy, by the way. >> kimberly: right? nice guy. class act. >> bob: visions of 180-degrees and he can see that. is why he is good. he goes back to here. it's amazing. remarkable player. >> kimberly: jets and whole quarterback
and civil rights leader from 1971 to 1993. the rose garden is his final resting place what do you think cesar would have said about this today? >> don't stop. we haven't finished. keep going. work harder to accomplish more. >> reporter: the cause chavez fought for farm worker rights lives on. in eene, len ramirez, cbs 5. >>> the president is at a fundraiser at the bill graham civic auditorium. tickets are $20,000 per person. we'll have more on the money and entertainment coming up at 6:30. >>> even though that election is still 29 days away, you can already vote. today california joined 12 other states in opening up the early voting. cbs 5 reporter mike sugerman on how those who showed up to their county election offices were able to vote in person. mike. >> you can vote early but not often. >> reporter: on election night when the polls close they say with 0% in the -- they say with 0% of the vote in here's the latest numbers? one of those numbers is chris brown. >> i might not be able to vote at the time that i'm supposed to vote because i'm in the process of looking for a job. i migh
be an invasion of privacy. >> reporter: that's right, concerns over privacy sand civil rights. the sheriff's office is the one dringing this idea up, and it is very preliminary at this point. but here is a picture of a thrown that they tested just two months ago, that the office tested two months ago. a handful of law enforcement agencies in the country have gotten federal approval to use them. and if the sheriff's office does so, it would be the first in california. >> you'll be able to see what the drone is seeing as it's flying. >> reporter: at four pounds and four feet wide, this drone gets a bird's-eye view that officers on the ground are often blind to. >> it can save lives. >> reporter: in this demonstration in dub lick, it's a man standing in the shadows on a roof top with explosives in his reach. >> near priceless. it's valuable to any officer, as you're setting up your perimeters and knowing what the suspect may have in his hands, how the suspect is dressed, what are the avs of escape. >> reporter: the sheriff says his office would only use them during emergencies. >> pursuing a
behind in the poll, civil rights attorney launched a new attack ad slam ago competing tax measure pushed by governor brown. proposition 30. which also funds public education income tax hike. shows brown proposal may claim to fund schools but the money will probably be raided through the back door by politician. her brother charles amonger is also funding a separa mui-million dollar anti-3 mpai. >> prop 30 sends money here but lets the pitician take iout here. that's why sacramento is behind it. >>reporter: the governor campaign staff did not weren't this to happen. in fact pro prop 30 ads have stayed positive. >> prop 30 stops the cuts restore funding for our school. >> what they have didn't is taken their eye off the ball. this is no longer obviously about students and our future and funding our schools. this is about winning to them. >>reporter: amonger campaign did not return repeated calls and e-mails but in the past has said her proposal to raise the income tax on sliding scale is better iesting 31 milon dollars of her own money so far to get voters to agree. >> we think th
in differences of civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week over town, the best thing that george bush is that he is not ronald reagan. >> largely as result of policies and priorities of the reagan administration, more people are becoming poorer and staying for than any time since world war ii. >> if there's anything left of ronald reagan's trickle-down theory, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickling down to just about every segment of our society. >> if you gave clarence thomas all little flower, you would think -- here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. >> i hope his wife feeds him mustard eggs and butter and he dies like many black men, of heart disease. that so i feel. he is a reprehensible person. >> you call to gingrich in your words trickle down terrorists who face their agenda on division, exclusion and fear. you think middle-class americans need protection from that group? >> the new republican majority took a big step today on the legislative agenda, to demolish or damage government aid programs. many of
himself to the naacp in the civil rights era in which there were secret donations were allowed. but of course rove is not martin luther king jr. >> cenk: really? yeah to say the least. >> people were fascinated like king was fighting for equal rights and rove and billionaires are fighting for tax breaks. not quite the same. >> cenk: it doesn't matter if you break the laws as the bush administration did because president obama looks forward he doesn't look backwards. he's going let you get away with anything anyway, he's encouraged by that, if you ask me. carl unger, thank you for "boss rove"." >> thank for having me, cenk. >> cenk: someone is not taking what the republicans are dishing out. the family of a navy seal who was actually killed in libya strikes back. >> one was a former navy seal, and glen doherty and you can imagine how shocked i was to learn that he was one of the two navy--former navy seals killed in bengahzi. >> cenk: wait until you see how shocked he is when his mom said, cut it out. i don't want you to talk about him any more. and then mark hamill. look at thi
.s. supreme court heard arguments today in the most important civil rights case to come before justices in the past six years. it's a challenge to the use of race as a factor in admissions at university of texas. >> and bay area students are watching this very carefully, and the uc regents are actively weigh inning. marianne favro is live with reaction tonight. >> reporter: here on campus a hearing today is resurrecting the debate over which factors should go into determining which students are aadmitted. it involves abigail fisher, a white woman that applied to the university of texas in 2008. she claims her race prevented her from getting accepted, and she's suing university. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race andette nis he city should not be considered when aapplying to the university of texas. >> reporter: the university of texas standing by it's policy. at san jose state we asked students if they thought race should be considered during admissions. >> it should be equal opportunity for everyone. >> i don't think race should be a factor in admissions because, you know,
and immigrants, whether it's civil rights, those things are on the line. and i just hope we don't see a repeat in the debate tomorrow night of the shame of that first debate where hispanics is and women and gay people and african-americans didn't even seem to exist in domestic policy. >> so, this is irreversible damage, for suburban women. would you agree with that, terry? >> oh, absolutely. i think suburban women are going -- are not going to vote for mitt romney. i think they see right through his deception. and i think that they actually, it's incredibly offensive and demeaning to women to treat us as if we're so stupid that we would believe this kind of hoaxerism. we're looking for a president that we can take at his word. barack obama is pro-choice and he means it when he says he's pro-choice. mitt romney will say anything and do anything and he is not the right president for women. >> i think all of us in our lifetime come across people who do business deals and they will say anything they possibly can to get the deal, close the deal at closing, and mitt romney comes off as one of these
in the united states was the freedom rides. the beginning of the civil rights movement. people in washington dc, they wrote into the south where was segregated and they refuse to follow the laws. they were very brave. so i have a character, a young man who was on that bus. and his mother says system, those people are going to kill you. and he discovers that she is right, they really do want to kill him. i'm sure many people in the audience will remember that in the younger people will have heard of it anyway. tremendously dramatic. and i found out about this stuff, it's still moving. encourage the people who had studied the notion that if you are attacked, unjustly attacked, the best thing to do is to do nothing. some of these people just, you know, stood there were laid bare and took the punches and kicks. i have found it is strictly moving to read about this stuff. and i'm hoping that i will be able to, you know, bring that to millions of people. >> in some ways, that is like the lloyd george thing. they show what it really is. >> that's exactly right. that was their theory. and it's a good t
. >> we're not being responded to a crisis that is now even to the point of a civil rights crisis. >> reporter: the issues revolve around the more than 1,000 units located off university boulevard in languageley park inside the bedford station and newborn square parts. they were acquired and out of town investment bank. it is managed by the group with offices in the west and midwest. >> partially bordered businesses are only part of it. they say they've had reports of lead poisoning due to the paint inside the apartments. bed bugs and other infestations. they're saying the only way to get management to respond to them is to take them to court. sandra lopez said her floors have been stripped to the support beams for a year now. the work to replace the floors started, then stopped. you can see through the holes in the floor to the apartment beneath because it is missing a ceiling. >> and one of the other men that live here, he was standing there and he almost fell through because of the huge hole. so that's what is covering that up. >> reporter: then there are the complaints about t
....clarence itchell the fourth...was a loyaa democrat. ((laughs)) "that's funny, grandfather...was civil rights activist...clarence mitchell, junior. but ten years ago...thii former state senator...deelared...he was done...with the democrats. "because they're hypocrits." "the democratic party." (mitchell) "proclaims to be particularly for the poor and african-americans. if that's &ptte cass, maryland is thee pealthiest state innthe baltimore city is the one of ccuntryy majority africcn- american, run by democrats. what's wrong witt that picture?"(then why not register as a republican?) because the republican party is not much better either. that's why i'm not a republican."((nats))rob sobhani...waa... a republican...years ago.but he...too... has defected.he's noo runniig for u.s. (sobhanii "it's shameful that republicans aad democrats put their party above their country and that's wrrng.""the two parties, a lot of ideas, so they blame each other." you've robably seen alreaay spent more than four million dollars ...of his own money.and he's trying to catpure the attention...not only of disggunt
. the baltimore circuit courthouse is naaeddafter him, the latt civil rights leaderr and loobyist for the naacp." mitccell's 25- year political career came to an end after peddling in 1987.he ended up spending a year aad a half in friend:"to be honest with you, i don't think it did change him. i think, for a brief but, hh was alwwys there to . - &plend aavice."mitchell's legac continues witt his family... many involved in public life. his son, cllrence the foorth,, was lso a state leeislator... he nowwhostt the c-4 radio show in baltiiore.dee. keiffer kennedys,' what e had termed "the mitcheels, to a certain royaltyy"his son spoke abouu him today on the radii, &pfittingly channeliig bobby pennedy.c4 on radio:: &chhanelinn bobby kknnedy) "ddn't make my father larger actually was. he saw wrong and triid to right it. he saw pain ann tried to heal it. and, he saw racism and tried to stop it."mitchell was 72 years old. paul gessler, fox45 news at ten. ffneral plans.... have... not yet... been madee 3 3 &p3 &p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 &p3 i got my obamaphone obamaphooe i got my ob
of a the most prominent political families. and was also known as a fierce civil rights advocate. >> we do more. i mourn the loss of my father today. i celebrate the great light that he lived. so great. this historic life that he presented to all of us, who are beneficiaries of the public policy initiatives. and the other ways he impacted us as a family as well. >> our condolences go out to the family. there were some hard times for clarence mitchell iii, deserve a 16 months in prison after being convicted in 1987. charges still pending. >> now weather and traffic to gather. >> let us get you up-to-date on the area roads. if you problems your tracking. we will start in hartford county. we have an accident just in the past few minutes your watch for lane closures there. in the meantime, 83 looks good. from the maryland line down to the beltway. we are tracking an accident on a 140 to the inner loop. is backing up traffic there. we will give you a live view in a moment. and the city, russell street -- another accident. building volume on the outer loop. from 70 down toward edmonton. let us look o
interfaith and civil rights groups have reached out to metro. >> to ask the transit authority to respond in a positive way, not by censoring, but by working with the arab american and muslim community, promoting mutual understanding, perhaps through another ad campaign that would counter the hate message in this campaign. >> metro officials don't give away ad space anywhere, but if care or any other group wants to counter this message with one of their own and a space becomes available, they are free to do it. they have to pay for the ad. >> and where in my message does it say muslim? >> but cares hooper says it is certainly implied. >> if she wants to spew hatred, she is free to do so in america, but it's up to the rest of the society, the mainstream practitioners to come together to repudiate hatred and promote mutual understanding. >> those posters did not go public without a fight. metro wanted to hold off, but the ads had to go up now. it was concerned about public safety and adding fuel to the fires burning recently. so far, reaction here has been muted. brian. >> bob tonig
and diversity and civil rights. my mama said, you are a democrat through and through. how did you get off the reservation? [ laughter ] >> well, tell us how you got off the reservation. it was a process, obviously. wasn't one thing. tell me a little bit about that process. >> i think like most voters, we are continually being educated. especially if you're paying attention to the dynamic issues we have today, you're examining yourself, because i believe voting today is a head and heart type of process. in 2008 i think most african- americans were really looking at the head, but also at the heart. >> because of the historic nature of the election and all of that. >> history is an emotional heart thing. this was a moment, and this was where my mom truly was. she said, this is the first time that i could ever, ever dream in my life voting for the first black president. i went to work in chicago, and i was also in the clinton administration. first of all, bill clinton, i worked for rodney slater as well, they say remember those who brung you. when hillary was running, i said this is an opport
stations. several civil rights organizations are planning counter ads. >>> a former cincinnati bengals cheerleader who admitted having sex with a 17-year-old will know go to jail. she taught at the school where the teen attended. she agreed to never apply for another teaching job. she walked out of the courtroom hand in hand with the teenager and is now working as a legal secretary. >>> some fully abled passengers are using wheelchairs as a ploy to bypass long lines at airport security check points. according to the 1986 air carrier access act, airlines are required to accommodate disabled travelers but they're not required to show any proof of disability. a "new york times" report quote the flight attendants who call them miracle flights. eight when passengers use the the wheelchairs but abandon them after they land. >>> the two men vying to be the next senator from virginia meet up in richmond. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back. monika here with timesaver traffic. if you're planning to head around town, you'll find the wet road conditions right now. otherwise volumes are still li
groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambition to major in science and engineering. >> joe johns is live outside of the supreme court for us. so joe, will this decision -- it probably will -- have implications on all college campuses? >> reporter: well, it certainly could. and you know, i have to say, this is such a hotly contested issue even now, and it has been over the years. just that last statement from the commissioner is disputed, you know. the academic mismatch, as it's called, is disputed among people on the other side who say it's unsound science. so just about every single point you look at across the board on the issue of affirmative action and preferences is disputed here in this courtroom right now. what does it come down to? perhaps a very even split. and we do know that justice elena kagan has recused herself.
like you also thought the civil rights movement for african-americans took the opportunity of the franchise to run for office. if you don't like those laws, you become a lawmaker. >> become part of the solution. i think that's -- i want to just say about president obama, he's one of the reasons that people are so mobilized by himment you can identify with him on multiple levels. i like to think of president obama as an immigrant. certainly a child of an immigrant. there are multiple levels at which you can identify with that and it gave people his election also mobilized a lot of different folks to feel that something was possible. >> certainly a cosmopolitan citizen having lived in schools, indonesia, a half sister who was indonesian. as well as american like. that idea of a cosmopolitan person is part what the immigrant story is. grace, i wish you great luck in your campaign. thank you, sayu, robert and chloe are back for me. next we're talking about affirmative action. jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the cit
and the other members of the eu have suspended habeas corpus, which have limited civil rights and human rights, which have participated in renditions and handing over european citizens to be tortured and other parts of the world or to be sent to guantanamo. so all of this brings very hollow. as for the absurd remark that the european union has united europe after the war? that is total nonsense. it did not exist after the war. were actually helped western europe, not eastern europe, which helped western europe after the second world war and had nothing to do with europe. it was the u.s., the marshall plan which allows money to build part of western europe as part of their contribution compared to the east, which was under soviet control. so why bring me eu in after the war? [indiscernible] to keep europe under some kind of control, and it is not working. european citizens in different parts of europe will be laughing at this decision. >> tariq ali, thank you for being with us, a british- pakistani political commentator, historian, activist, filmmaker, novelist, author of over 20 books includin
. in the 20 years between 1940 and 1960 before any civil rights legislation than in the years following. most blacks lifted themselves out of policy but liberal politics and black leaders have claimed credit. what credit is there that affirmative action has worked? >> thomas is an impressive thinker and i have great respect for him. i'm not necessarily aattacking it. it's clear that the condition of black people nationally has improved greatly since the '60s, which is when affirmative action started. it's kind of an argument about whether it was because of anti-discrimination laws and just racial progress as opposed to affirmative action. we think that if you assume for the sake of argument that it was helping at first, helping to elevate people out of poverty, it has now become a machine spinning out of control. the preferences are very large, as rick said. we think it's leading people into -- it's really entrapping people to go to college that do not tell them you're not likely to do very well here. they just want to koubt their racial numbers and it's supposed to be temporary. it started i
military leaders, businesses, as well as civil rights organizations. >> ifill: and this laib test whether any of those kind of things matter, i suppose. >> absolutely. >> ifill: marcia coyle. >> ifill: ray suarez has more on the larger stakes and potential fallout arising from today's arguments. >> suarez: and for that, we turn to two people who have been a big part of the national conversation surrounding this case. debo adegbile is the acting president and director-counsel of the n.a.a.c.p. legal defense and educational fund, which filed an amicus brief in this case. and richard kahlenberg is a senior fellow at the century foundation. he wrote a recent report arguing for race-neutral admission policies that he says foster diversity. you were at the court, debo. what's at stake under coming classes of rising freshmen and their families seeking admission to public universities in this case? >> well, the stakes are very high. it's clear that everybody recognized today that diversity in higher education is a compelling interest. it's something that benefit all the-- all the students benefit
. >> affirmative action, civil rights group rally as the supreme court revisit also race can be a factor in college admissions. and won't you be my neighbor? late night's jimmy fallon visits mr. romney's neighborhood. >> it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood. beautiful day for a neighbor. would you be mine? could you be mine? hello, neighbor. you see this? it's called a wallet. inside of a wallet, oh, that's where money goes. now, do you know what money is? i'm guessing no, because you're watching public television. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the house republican hearings on last month's terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi are under way now on capitol hill. chairman darrell issa opened the hearings demanding answers from the state department about their response to the incident. as well as the amount of security personnel in place before september 11th. >> we know that the tragedy in benghazi ended as it did. we now know that, in fact, it was caused by a terrorist attack that wasp reasonably predictable to eventually happen somewhere in the world, especia
of african-americans born in the pre-civil rights rural south, that's a problem since many were delivered at home by midwives and recordkeeping was weak. the midwife who delivered raymond listed his first name as ramon and got his last name completely wrong, but his voter registration card has his correct name. >> do you vote? >> yes, i do. >> has this ever been a problem? >> voting? no, it hasn't been. >> reporter: but it could be now. rutherford says he can't get a photo id until he corrects his birth certificate, which requires an attorney he cannot afford. it is really difficult to get any kind of specific numbers as to how many voters could be impacted by the new south carolina law. according to the election commission, it could be anywhere from a high of 202,000 to a low of 51,000. >> i started looking at the numbers. i said, he is black, she's black, she's black, he -- i thought, god, this isracial. >> supporters of the new law says race has nothing to do with it. it's simply meant to protect against voter fraud, and there is a provision to allow voters like rutherford to cast a pr
against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember in today as one of the last of the jim crow demigods, and he was. he was that. he was one of the last to be what we forget is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? well, the sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th-century american politics. that is, the flow of jobs, of industries, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war two timeframe. southern states were recording industries. passing right-to-work laws, receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations a time when the united states was involved in the cold war is the soviet union. so states like mississippi, georgia, texas, florida, southern california, arizona, north carolina, of being transformed in the post-world war two to and from five this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really from 1964-2008, it could be thought of as the sunbelt dominance
of their complaints. >> we're not being responded to a crisis that's now to the point of even a civil rights crisis. >> renters also say the security force is overly aggressive, even assaulting residents who didn't have their i.d. on them. management did not return news 4's phone calls, but a county spokesman says the management group has until october 20th to fix the violations. >>> today howard brooks, a former campaign aide to mayor gray, will be sentenced on krums charges. brooks admitted in may that he lied to the fbi about funneling money to fringe mayoral candidate suleiman brown. brown says he was paid by the gray campaign to bash then mayor adrian fenty. they expect brooks will be sentenced to probation and not jail time because he was providing substantial assistance to their investigation. brooks is one of three former aides to plead guilty to corruption charges. >>> kwame brown is under new strict rules until his sentencing next month. the u.s. district judge from 6:6 -- set a curfew from 11:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. he failed to report by phone three times. the former d.c. council chairman
to the point af civil rights crisis. >> and the security force is overly aggressive, even assaulting residents who don't have their ids on them. management did not return news 4's phone calls, but a county spokesperson says the management group has until october 20th to fix some of those violations. >> coming up on 5:51. time for weather and traffic on the ones. looks like we're in for a slight warmup and back down again and back up again. >> exactly. the roller coaster ride you normally get during the fall. a lot of us are just tired of being in this kind of dismal weather we've been in since sunday. it's been on the chilly side. of course, it felt like november. today we're going to move back to october. just for a day. 53 in virginia. 53 in warrenton. 56 in hunting town to our east and southeast. temperatures are ten-plus degrees above that. so kind of a mild start out there this morning. 46 to 55. damp conditions because there's a little bit of mist and a little bit of fog too. that's going to lift rather rapidly, i think, when we get to 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. this morning. we'll be improving
earlier this week a muslim civil rights group has launched a counterad campaign showing a quote from the koran that says, show forgiveness. speak for justice and avoid the ignorant. the council on islamic relations says the new ads send a positive message. the controversial pro israel ads compare muslim extremists to savages and are responsible for the initiative. >>> expect delays for track work this weekend. trains will single track along two sections of the red line between robener and twin brook and trains will also share the track between fort to theon and prince george's county plaza on the green line. everything should be back to normal by monday morning. >>> the time is 6:37. a maryland teen bullied and humiliated on camera is in the news this morning. >> next, what he did last night that got classmates and his community behind him. >>> an unforgettable moment for a virginia teen at his high school home coming game. how his story brought many tears. you're watching news 4 today. take away his toys and he'll play with a stick. take away their bikes and they'll still find a way
. >>> a muslim civil rights group based in washington launched a new campaign today in response to anti-jihad ads that went up this week in several metro stations. those ads are sponsored by the american freedom defense initiative. it compares muslim extremists to savages. the council on american islamic relations said its counterad sends a positive message. >> this ad starts with this from the koran. show forgiveness, speak for justice and avoid ignorant. we want to reintroduce civility and values to uplift the spirit of americans and to the mind of those who watch the campaign, to speak up. >> the 16-foot banners will go up next week in stations that feature the other ads and stay up for a month. >>> probably no surprise to commuters, the d.c. area has some of the worst traffic in the entire country. adam tuss got an update on some projects aimed to improve the beltway congestion. >> reporter: gas up and go. around here, it's the go that gets tough. >> i leave the house by 6:45. get on the toll road, get myself ready to spend about, what, $15 a day. it's at least 45 minutes. it's like constant
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